The (CERSH) Rural Sexual Health Conference 2015
 
Sexual Health Research

We invite the submission of abstracts (see example) for this stream, which is focusing on sexual health research in a rural Australian context. Papers of all kinds will be considered however we have an interest in the following themes: 

  • Sexual Health Research in rural practice 

  • Management and control of STIs/BBVs in rural communities

  • Enhancing the rural sexual health service system

  • Collaboration in rural sexual health research and service delivery

  • The Cultural context of sexual health in the rural setting: workforce considerations?

Example Abstract

HIGHER EMERGENCY PRESENTATIONS RATES FOR PELVIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASE, ECTOPIC PREGNANCY AND EPIDIDYMITIS IN NON-METROPOLITAN THAN METROPOLITAN QUEENSLAND AND NSW RESIDENTS

Authors: Goller JL1, Kong F1, Guy, R2, Fairley C1, Bingham A1, Hocking J1

1Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 2Kirby Institute, University of NSW

Background and aims
Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ectopic pregnancy (EP) among women and epididymitis among men are important sequelae of chlamydia. Hospitalisations for these conditions have decreased in recent years although chlamydia notifications have increased. We assessed recent trends in hospital emergency presentations (ED) for these conditions in Queensland and NSW.

Methods
PID, EP and epididymitis ED rates per 100,000 among 15-44 year old Queensland and NSW residents were calculated for the years 2009-2011 using hospital emergency episodes and population census data. Logistic regression was used to assess rate changes over time adjusted for age-group, residential location (metropolitan versus non-metropolitan) and state.  

Results
Between 2009 and 2011, overall ED rates per 100,000 among 15-44 year old Queensland and NSW residents were 65 (95%CI:63, 67) for PID, 48 (95%CI:46, 49) for EP and 48 (95%CI:46, 49) for epididymitis.  By age, PID rates decreased from 109 in 15-24 year olds to 62 and 28 in women 25-34 and 35-44 years respectively (p<0.01), EP rates were highest among 25-34 year olds (p<0.01). Epididymitis rates were highest in 15-24 year olds (p<0.01). Between 2009-2011, rates for PID increased by 27% per year (OR=1.27; 95%CI:1.22, 1.31); declined for EP (OR=0.92;95%CI: 0.88, 0.96) and were unchanged for epididymitis: OR=0.99;95%CI:0.95, 1.04). Rates for each condition were higher in non-metropolitan than metropolitan residents (PID: 107 versus 49; EP: 67 versus 41; epididymitis: 66 versus 41; p<0.01) and over fourfold higher in Queensland than NSW (PID:OR=8.6; 95%CI:7.9, 9.4; EP:OR=4.1;95%CI:3.8, 4.5; epididymitis: OR=4.5;95%CI:4.1, 4.8). 

Conclusions
Variable access to primary healthcare may influence higher ED rates for chlamydia related morbidity in non-metropolitan Queensland and NSW residents. 

Disclosure of Interest Statement
These data are being analysed as part of the Australian Chlamydia Control Effectiveness Pilot study funded by the Department of Health and Ageing and National Health and Medical Research Council.