2018 International First Aid Education Conference
DETAILED AGENDA
Sunday, April 22, 2018
8:00 am - 9:00 amPre-Conference Workshop Registration Open
9:00 am - 5:00 pmOPTIONAL PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS: Please see Registration and Fees Tab for Pre-Conference Workshop costs. Workshop sign-up is an option in addition to registration or can be purchased on its own.
9:00 am - 5:00 pmPsychological First Aid Instructor Development
The Canadian Red Cross is pleased to offer an Instructor development opportunity for those interested in becoming a Psychological First Aid (PFA) Instructor. This one day workshop will prepare existing Instructors from a variety of Prevention & Safety (First Aid, Respect Education, Swimming & Water Safety), Emergency Response, and external body instructional backgrounds for service as a Psychological First Aid Instructor. Psychological First Aid is dedicated to preparing those learners who will be supporting a person(s) in crisis - it is a humane, supportive, preventative and practical help to those suffering serious crisis events. Using a variety of dynamic educational methods this workshop will explore the unique nuances of a PFA classroom and its learners, the tool box available to support your practice and provide the opportunity for application among your peer group. Please note, this workshop will include pre-session online learning activities. A mentorship following this workshop is required prior to issuance of Instructor certification (valid for three years time). This workshop will be offered in English only and includes your Instructor kit.
9:00 am - 5:00 pmWilderness First Responder Instructor Development
The Canadian Red Cross is pleased to offer an Instructor development opportunity for those interested in becoming a Wilderness First Responder Instructor (WFRI). This one day workshop will prepare existing Instructors (certified as a Advanced Wilderness Remote First Aid) to support our new course offering – Wilderness First Responder. Wilderness First Responder is dedicated to those who will provide extended care (five or more days) and evacuation protocols. It is a program suitable for those who will be in regions without EMS and intense environmental conditions, supporting persons on expedition. This workshop will explore the unique nuances of a Wilderness First Responder classroom (both indoors and outdoors) and its learners – considering how the worlds of wilderness and professional responder collide to create a unique learning experience. Please note, this workshop will include learning which takes place indoors and outdoors – candidates are required to bring all appropriate clothing for the outdoor learning segment. Your clinical skills for AWRFA will need to be confirmed prior to attending the workshop through a skill sign-off. Pre-workshop learning activities will include completion of the ‘Fundamentals of Instruction – First Aid Programs’ online component (if not already completed as part of other program updates). A Teaching Experience will be included as a development component following this workshop. This workshop will be offered in English only and includes your Instructor kit.
9:00 am - 5:00 pmBasic Life Support Instructor Development (Track 1: Duty to Respond)
The Canadian Red Cross is pleased to offer an Instructor development opportunity for those interested in becoming a Basic Life Support Instructor (BLSI). This one day workshop will prepare existing CRC Instructors to support our new course offering – Basic Life Support. Basic Life Support is dedicated to learners whose duty to respond requires them to be involved with high performance resuscitation teams within a variety of specialized health care environments. There will be two workshop streams available – one for Instructors who work with those who have a duty to respond (fire fighters, paramedics, lifeguards, etc..). These Instructors will be mainly supporting BLS learning within a broader course offering (example: integrated within a First Responder, Emergency Medical Responder, or Lifeguarding course). The second stream is intended for those Instructors who are workplace focused and will typically support learners who take BLS as a stand-alone course. The second stream is designed for Instructors who have not yet worked within the professional responder programs at CRC (example – CPRIs, FAIs, WRFAIs and AWRFAIs) and will include additional clinical skill development components to bridge you from your previous Instructional work to the BLS content. Using a variety of dynamic educational methods both workshops will explore the unique nuances of a BLS classroom and its learners, the tool box available to support your practice and provide the opportunity for application among your peer group. Your clinical skills (appropriate to your Instructor level) will be confirmed prior to attending the workshop through a skill sign-off. You are able to complete this prior to arrival or select to attend a skill session the morning of the workshop. Pre-workshop learning activities will include completion of the ‘Fundamentals of Instruction – First Aid Programs’ online component (if not already completed as part of other program updates). A Teaching Experience will be included as a development component following this workshop. This workshop will be offered in English only and includes your Instructor kit.
9:00 am - 5:00 pmBasic Life Support Instructor Development (Track 2: Workplace Focus)
The Canadian Red Cross is pleased to offer an Instructor development opportunity for those interested in becoming a Basic Life Support Instructor (BLSI). This one day workshop will prepare existing CRC Instructors to support our new course offering – Basic Life Support. Basic Life Support is dedicated to learners whose duty to respond requires them to be involved with high performance resuscitation teams within a variety of specialized health care environments. There will be two workshop streams available – one for Instructors who work with those who have a duty to respond (fire fighters, paramedics, lifeguards, etc..). These Instructors will be mainly supporting BLS learning within a broader course offering (example: integrated within a First Responder, Emergency Medical Responder, or Lifeguarding course). The second stream is intended for those Instructors who are workplace focused and will typically support learners who take BLS as a stand-alone course. The second stream is designed for Instructors who have not yet worked within the professional responder programs at CRC (example – CPRIs, FAIs, WRFAIs and AWRFAIs) and will include additional clinical skill development components to bridge you from your previous Instructional work to the BLS content. Using a variety of dynamic educational methods both workshops will explore the unique nuances of a BLS classroom and its learners, the tool box available to support your practice and provide the opportunity for application among your peer group. Your clinical skills (appropriate to your Instructor level) will be confirmed prior to attending the workshop through a skill sign-off. You are able to complete this prior to arrival or select to attend a skill session the morning of the workshop. Pre-workshop learning activities will include completion of the ‘Fundamentals of Instruction – First Aid Programs’ online component (if not already completed as part of other program updates). A Teaching Experience will be included as a development component following this workshop. This workshop will be offered in English only and includes your Instructor kit.
5:00 pm - 9:00 pmGeneral Registration Open
Beat the crowd. Get your registration badge and conference packet early!

Monday, April 23, 2018
7:00 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
7:00 am - 7:00 pmRegistration Open
8:30 am - 9:30 amWELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS: Consider How We have Evolved Over Time and Why This is the Time for Our Evolution to Take Shape in the Form of this Conference!
9:30 am - 10:30 amOPENING KEYNOTE: STRESSED TO KILL
Sylvia!, Owner, Mindbody Works
Stress is the next health epidemic. Stress leave costs businesses over 50 billion dollars a year. With mental illness on the rise, everywhere you turn people are ready to blow their top! In “Stressed to Kill” Sylvia! takes an in-depth look at the effects of stress, shares her powerful tools to reduce stress (the legal and moral ones only….) as well as personal strategies for becoming the “boss “of your stress. Discover better health and a dramatically improved quality of life! And if that’s not enticing enough, how about learning the secret to slowing the aging process? Sylvia! will share that too!
10:30 am - 11:00 amBreak & Exhibits Open
11:00 am - 12:00 pmBREAKOUT THEME: ENVIRONMENT (select one session)
11:00 am - 12:00 pmLearning on the Fly! How does Your Environment Inform Your Learning Needs? Instilling Confidence
Speaker: Nancy Claxton
Speaker: Loriann Hynes, Assistant Professor at York University and Athletic Therapy Program Director, York University
11:00 am - 12:00 pmPublic Health Crisis + Political Pressure + Staff Exceeding 3000 + Only 38 Days = Successfully Trained Providers Through Blended Learning Education
Michael Nemeth, Program Manager, Canadian Council for First Aid Education, Sunnybrook Centre for Prehospital Medicine, Toronto Fire S
At the end of the session you will have gained an understanding of a scalable training model that can be adapted to any social or natural emergency that requires immediate objective based training. This lecture based/group discussion presentation will address the catalyst of the opioid crisis and how it was the impetus for the largest fire service in the country to train all of its operational staff in a short period of time with a focus on provider and patient safety. In addition, we will delve deeper into the importance of situational awareness, medical oversight, partnerships, faculty training, training tools that contribute to achieving your objectives and ongoing quality assurance.
11:00 am - 12:00 pmBeat on the Street: Understanding the Needs of a Community
Speaker: Sarah Burke, Senior Manager of Community Integrated Development in Disaster Programs , Canadian Red Cross
Jude Holmes, Head of Education Marketing, British Red Cross
11:00 am - 12:00 pmMind the Gap: Understanding the Science and Closing the Gaps
Dr. Andrew MacPherson, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia
11:00 am - 12:00 pmGeek Stuff: Creative Uses for Technology First Aid Education
Explore how different types of technology can be used creatively in a first aid classroom! During this session participants will consider a variety of different tech tools that can be used to enhance first aid learning, sometimes in unusual and unsuspecting ways. Facilitators and participants will each come prepared to share their best practices, lessons learned and ideas for future application!
11:00 am - 12:00 pmSide Bar 1
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
12:00 pm - 1:00 pmLunch & Exhibits Open - Poster Presentation 1 / Journal Contributors
Poster Presentation 1 / journal contributors
1:00 pm - 1:45 pmDr.Hossam Elsharkawi, Vice President of International Operations - Canadian Red Cross
Dr. Hossam Elsharkawi, Vice President for International Operations, Canadian Red Cross
The Potential of Partnerships
When the Nepal Earthquake struck in April of 2015, much of the damage was in remote and inaccessible mountain regions in the Centre, North and East of the Country. The local and international emergency response that followed was massive, and to some extent continues to this day with recovery efforts aimed at strengthening local capacities and building back better. The Canadian Red Cross (CRC) deployed its tented field hospital to the Nepal-Tibet mountains (town of Dhunche) as the local district hospital had collapsed. As the situation stabilised, 4 months post the quake, CRC and McGill Universities Global Trauma Care Group, embarked on a program to both rebuild the local hospital, and train local staff at both capital and district levels in ESS: it would prove doable and challenging. The curricula were adopted nationally, training, and training of trainers continue, in partnership with the Ministry of Health, local medical schools, teaching hospitals, Nepal Red Cross, and McGill. Many stakeholders needed to shape the priorities, agenda, and commit to action. Moreover, interdependence and leveraging comparative expertise was a key ingredient to success.
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmBREAKOUT THEME: YOUTH ENGAGEMENT (select one session)
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmTurning First Aid into a Child's Play by Creating Effective Educational Materials for Children: the Example of Sub-Saharan Africa
Speaker: Dr. Jorien Laermans, Methodological Expert , Belgian Red Cross
Kristopher Tharris
Do you feel strongly about investing in first aid training for children all over the world, so that they can learn this important life skill and feel empowered by it? Are you convinced that the scope and the methods used during this training should be age- and context-adapted, but are you wondering how to achieve this? If so, this session might be just what you need!

During this hour, you will learn more about the ongoing project of the Belgian Red Cross on the development of evidence-based first aid educational materials for children in sub-Saharan Africa. You will discover how the best available scientific evidence was adapted to the African context by a multidisciplinary expert panel, giving rise to:
(1) an “educational pathway” that indicates at what age children can reach certain objectives at the level of knowledge, skills and attitudes concerning first aid, and
(2) a list of recommended educational methods and materials. In addition, you will find out how this information is used to create the actual materials, which will be piloted in several African countries, enabling us to further tweak them to the preferences of the children and trainers.

This session will increase your insight into the process of developing evidence-based first aid materials that are age- and context-appropriate. Moreover, you will leave this session knowing which first aid goals can be achieved by which age group of children, feeling inspired to create new and effective first aid training programs for children.
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmCase Studies: First Aid Education in Other Curriculums & Risk Management
Speaker: Shelley Dalke
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmEnhancing Community Engagement by Leveraging the 21st Century Learning Skills Through the Use of Simulation
Speaker: Thomas McLean
Speaker: Dr. Stacy Desilets
We will discuss an innovative collaboration in first aid education between Northern Ontario rural physicians and secondary school students.

Youth consistently report low sense of intellectual engagement, interest and motivation in grades 11 and 12. Secondary school students often lack access to experiential learning opportunities in first aid and medical training. Rural physicians lack opportunities to obtain required continuing medical education credits and maintain acute and critical care skills that occur with low frequency and high acuity.

Join us on a virtual field trip to witness a live Simulation and debrief in the SimLab at Timiskaming District Secondary School. You will meet staff, physicians and students who will share strategies for youth engagement, explore how simulation has strengthened our community’s medical professionals capacity and helped to identify gaps requiring learning interventions.

We will explore the role of simulation to: create authentic experiences which increase student, educator and community engagement; share best practices for developing a culture of learning to learn where students are coached to provide critical peer feedback. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the 21st Century Competencies outlined by the Ministry of Education and how they can implement critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity into their practice with concrete examples.
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmBuilding a Research Project
Speaker: Dr. Brian Miller
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmAny New Ways to the Same Topics? Yes! Find out More
Speaker: Shelly Longmore, Canadian Red Cross, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Choosing Wisely Alberta
Speaker: Hugo Supranenant
This toolbox session will explore how you can use regular classroom items in irregular ways when teaching first aid. Using a fishbowl approach, participants will consider items which can be included in their teaching kit that can be multifunctional and part of ‘on the fly’ facilitation. Participants are encouraged to bring any resources that they like to keep stocked in their own teaching kit to share with their peers!
2:00 pm - 3:00 pmSide Bar 2
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmBREAKOUT THEME: PSYCO SOCIAL WELLNESS (select one session)
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmCase Based Learning in Psychological First Aid
Speaker: Judi Fairholm
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmLay-Responder Post Arrest Support Model
Paul Snobelen, Peel Regional Paramedic Services
Gordon Nevils, Supervisor, Education, Research, and Community Programs, Peel Regional Paramedic Services
Introduction: The LRSM provides a structured framework to capture information about the experience of witnessing a sudden cardiac arrest from the lay responders involved and the role they played in the event, the actual clinical records, and to identify areas of support for bystander’s residual mental health. It helps Paramedic Services address a public mental health need of people involved in responding to emergencies. It potentially goes beyond cardiac arrest situations and may prove helpful to psychological first aid providers and other public Problem Being Addressed: As early as 1993, consideration of the psychological effect of providing CPR on bystanders emerged as an underappreciated concern. Questions of effect and support remain in the field. One consideration is the ethics of asking people to respond to such emergencies without proper support. This highlights the need to understand the psychological impact of responding to a sudden cardiac arrest situation and a systematic approach to support individual. Methods: Through an iterative process, we developed a systematic means to collect lay responder data regarding the context of the incident and lay responder reactions. The Lay Responder Support Model (LRSM) emerged from the analysis of the data collected during 28 incidents and debriefings with 64 lay responders who acted in various ways to save a sudden cardiac arrest victim. During the first informal conversations, participants readily identified the effects of mental trauma, which led us to formalize the debriefing process and data collection tools. Various iterations of the model have incorporated feedback from professionals/scholars in health sciences, mental health, and first aid education. The program now involves 3 stages: Identifying and Engaging with the Lay Responders, Debriefing with the Lay Responders and Follow-up & Referral for Professional Support. Pertinent Messages: In almost all the cases, lay responders communicated effects in their daily life, including a wide range of acute physical and/or psychological reactions to the event. For some individuals, acute stress reactions caused enough distress to interfere with everyday activities. These findings resulted in the application of Psychological First Aid principles: identifying victims and facilitating them toward mental health support promotes recovery has wide spread application in traumatic events like disasters. The LRSM design now supports engagement with lay responders very early in post-event period, and informed by continual findings.
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmNo Health without Mental Health: Using High Fidelity Simulation and Virtual Reality to Promote Emotional Resilience and Emotional Intelligence in Student Paramedics
Katie Pavoni, Senior Lecturer in Pre-Hospital Care
According to the World Health Organization mental health is one of the leading causes of global ill health with some 450 million individuals living with a diagnosed mental health condition worldwide. The impact of poor mental health is both multifaceted and wide reaching with evidence suggesting that life expectancy is reduced by up to 20 years for those experiencing enduring mental health challenges. Despite this and the fact that 25% of the population will be affected by a mental health challenge at some point in their lives, significant stigma and a lack of understanding is often attributed to this field which as a result has a direct impact upon both individual quality of life and recovery. Pre-hospital education has traditionally been centred upon physical health crises with little emphasis placed upon increasing knowledge and confidence of social emergencies such as supporting an individual experiencing a mental health crisis. At St George’s, University of London an innovative Mental Health education module has been devised as part of the BSc in Paramedic Science to challenge this disparity. The use of high fidelity simulation, live actors and virtual reality offer a safe space for learners to develop their non-technical skills such as emotional intelligence and communication, whilst simultaneously promoting empathy, neutrality and compassion. Measurements of pre and post learning have shown a significant improvement in learner’s confidence and knowledge of supporting an individual in mental health crisis along with a tangible impact upon future practice. All sessions are also informed by service users who are expert by experience.This interactive learner based session will explore how simulation can be utilised to increase emotional intelligence and resilience amongst responders alongside challenging prejudice and attitudes towards mental health throughout all tiers of prehospital education. It also explores the crucial issue of responder wellbeing and strategies for learners to manage difficult or distressing situations. This session will explore the importance of psychosocial interventions with hope and optimism, whilst promoting the crucial message that there is simply no health without mental health.
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmFirst Aid Education as Translational Science: Transferring Research to Practice
David Berry, Professor, Saginaw Valley State University
Context: To improve patient care; scientific discoveries, devices and best practice must be translated into clinical applications. Interventions in first aid education have the ability to translate into advancements in the development of first aid providers, as well as care given to individuals and populations. Objective: To introduce the concept of first aid education research as translational science and provide an example of its application. Background: The knowledge and skills needed by first aid providers to reduce morbidity and mortality by alleviating suffering, preventing further illness or injury, and promoting recovery exists. And while local, state, or provincial regulatory requirements limit the ability to implement recommended first aid recommendations; many first aid providers or educators; for numerous reasons do not always implement evidence-based practices. It is important that educational strategies translate into improved attitudes toward implementing evidence-based practice related to emergency care, and improved patient care and outcomes. This is accomplished by applying a translational science approach to first aid education research. Description: First aid education research can be considered translational science as long as it meets certain criteria. Research showing an effect on the development of first aid knowledge, skills, or professionalism is termed T1-translational science. Educational strategies developing skills and favorable attitudes in practicing first aid towards the utilization of a tourniquet to control severe bleeding is an examples of this. T2-translational science occurs when educational outcomes transfer to clinical practice. Examples include educational practices that lead to more practicing first aid providers preparing for and using tourniquets when managing severe bleeding. T3-translational science describes research findings that improve the health of patients. This area includes health care delivery and policies that show improvements in the health of individuals or populations. In order for first aid education to fit into this category, research needs to directly link educational practices to improved patient outcomes is needed. Clinical Advantage(s): Educational practices that enhance first aid providers skills, improve patient care and outcomes can be considered translational science. This is important because the National Institutes of Health and other funding sources will provide grants for translational research. Conclusion(s): Educational research and practices have the ability to improve the development of first aiders, the quality of patient care practices, and patient outcomes. First aid educators should consider the ways that their teaching methods will translate into changes in these areas.
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmEmpowering First Aiders Through Innovative Instructor Resources
Victoria Logan
Dominique MacDonald
Each year more and more Canadians gain training in first aid; yet research still shows that bystander are still not comfortable helping others. Why? What can we do as programmers or instructors to change this? This session will seek to answer these questions. Attendees will learn what the University of Calgary has done to support and motivate their instructor. We will also get a chance to try out activities and games created to help educate and support first aid candidates. This fast-paced hands-on session is sure to motivate you!
3:15 pm - 4:15 pmSide Bar 3
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
4:15 pm - 4:30 pmBreak & Exhibits Open
4:30 pm - 5:30 pmBill Mintram, Senior Manager - Indigenous Relations, Canadian Red Cross
Kristopher Tharris
How Reconciliation impacts all persons
5:30 pm - 7:00 pmWelcome Reception

Tuesday, April 24, 2018
7:00 am - 9:00 amBreakfast and Exhibits Open
7:00 am - 7:00 pmRegistration Open
9:00 am - 10:00 amSpeaker Panel - Brace Yourselves: The Role of Prevention and Safety Education in Emergency Readiness and Responding to Crisis
Moderator: Dr. Andrew MacPherson, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia
Speaker: Dr. Aaron Orkin, University of Toronto and Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Medicine Institute
Speaker: Dr. Pascal Cassan,, Chair , Global First Aid Reference Centre International Red Cross / Red Crescent Society
Speaker: Sarah Burke, Senior Manager of Community Integrated Development in Disaster Programs , Canadian Red Cross
The role of education in emergency readiness and responding to crisis event.
10:00 am - 10:15 amBreak & Exhibits Open
10:15 am - 11:15 amBREAKOUT THEME: AGING POPULATIONS (select one session)
10:15 am - 11:15 amIt's a Tapestry: Community Based First Aid and Integrated Health
Speaker: Dr. David Price
Speaker: Lesley-Ann Morley
10:15 am - 11:15 amEmergency 911: How Does Paramedic Service Evolve to Help Burdens on our Health Systems
Speaker: Kevin Smith
10:15 am - 11:15 amDisaster Preparedness and Response in Older Adults: A Discussion
Speaker: Alan Batt, Associate Professor, CQUniversity
Older adults are disproportionately affected by disasters when they occur, from health, psychosocial and social perspectives. The needs of older adults are different, are at times complex, and are often overlooked during disaster planning and response. A review of the literature revealed that the largest group facing increased risk from disasters at present are older adults. Disaster planning organisations should seek to include the voice of older persons at all stages of planning. Older adults are in general poorly prepared for disaster events, due to many reasons, including access to resources, social isolation, physical mobility issues and chronic health conditions. Standard disaster preparedness advice appears to do older adults a disservice. This session will review the findings of the literature review, provide improved practical advice on disaster preparedness and response for older adults and those responsible for planning and response, and will allow those present to share their views, engage in discussion, and give their advice to others in attendance.
10:15 am - 11:15 amIt's All GREET to ME
Speaker: Joanna Muise, Senior Advisor for First Aid Program Development , Canadian Red Cross
Speaker: Emily Oliver, Senior Education Research Manager, British Red Cross
As each of us involved in prevention & safety education know, sharing our ideas and experiences with one another is exciting! It can inspire creativity, support dynamic discussions, and help us to improve our own practice as professionals. Figuring out how to collect our thoughts and share our experiences however, can be tricky at times. Sometimes information gets stuck in your brain and you don’t recognize to share it with others; other times you find yourself searching for a format to share your experience in so that it makes sense to someone else. Researchers will often use ‘checklists’ as a tool to organize information so that it is transparent and accurate, and nothing is missing when sharing with others. Different types of research projects can draw from different styles of checklists, each with the goal of having the information be more easily understood by others. This session will explore using the GREET checklist (guideline for reporting evidence-based practice, educational interventions and teaching). During this activity filled workshop we will consider how the checklist can be used to support each of us when planning a learning intervention, reflecting on its success and sharing our experience with others. We will dive into the full checklist as well as an abbreviated format, both of which can be meaningful to your practice. Get ready to start speaking GREET!




10:15 am - 11:15 amRev your Engines: Icebreakers, Energizers and Team Building
This toolbox session will raise your energy level and twist your brain inside out! Participants in this exciting session will work with facilitators and peers to explore the value of icebreakers and energizers in team building. The session will be action packed, providing participants with a ton of great new activities to include in their own practice as Instructors/Instructor Trainers. Participants are encouraged to bring any resources that they like to use in their own classroom to share with their peers!
10:15 am - 11:15 amSide Bar 4
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
11:30 am - 12:30 pmBREAKOUT THEME: DISASTER/CRISIS (select one session)
11:30 am - 12:30 pmCommunity Engagement: The Emergency Action Plan and the Need for Continued Education
David Berry, Professor, Saginaw Valley State University
Speaker: Dr. Jeffrey L. Pellegrino, Professor/Program Director, Aultman College of Nursing & Health Sciences
Context: Recognizing the multiple reasons for sudden death, awareness of injuries and illnesses allow healthcare professionals, administrators, and community members the opportunity to create, implement and monitor the effectiveness of primary and secondary prevention measures when sponsoring or engaging in organized events. Objective: The purpose of this session is to assist first aid providers and organization with the emergency planning that should be developed and implemented when hosting a variety of community events. The session will examine and discuss the emergency action plan's central components: (1) equipment, (2) personnel, (3) procedures, and (4) equipment. Background: Emergencies, accidents, and even natural disasters are rarely predictable; having a rapid and controlled response (EAP) will make the difference between an effective and an ineffective emergency response plan. However, EAPs are not the only solution to prevent morbidity and mortality rates. Preparing for and being able to administer prompt emergency care is critical to patient outcomes and survival.1, , , Description: Event preparedness not only hinges on a well- thought out, integrated, and practiced EAP as discussed above, it depends on having a properly prepared first aid or emergency trauma kit(s) and emergency equipment (e.g., AED) that is easily accessible during an accident.2, , The community and organizations should always be prepared for the worst-case scenario with equipment appropriate for the situation and environment. As Liberman and Mulder6 suggest, “proper equipment is crucial regarding the management of the acute airway during a sporting event. Equipment should be simple, organized, and portable.” In fact, the concept of “more is better,” may in fact not be the case, especially if the more is equipment that will not be useful in the presence of a life-threatening emergency. Practical Applications: As the scope of practice and evidence-based knowledge regarding emergency management and equipment evolves, communicating these changes to healthcare professionals, administrators and community members are paramount. Continuing education should not only improve an individual’s knowledge and attitude towards administering effective interventions, but also encourage maintaining a properly prepared emergency kit based on evidence-based guidelines. Conclusions: Organizations, schools, and communities sponsoring events where a risk for injury and illness exists should consciously and continually strive to document, post, and practice their EAP and aim to meet the time-sensitive goals to improve patient outcomes. Additionally, they are encouraged to maintain a properly prepared emergency kit based on evidence-based guidelines. Word Count: 388
11:30 am - 12:30 pmFirst Aid for All Learners: How to Adapt First Aid Education for People with Developmental and Learning Disabilities
Carolyn Hoekstra, Learning Resource Manager, Christian Horizons
How can you adapt first aid courses for participants who have a learning or developmental disability? How do you help people who have limited English communication skills to be confident in learning the content and applying the skills within the tight timelines of a regular first aid course? How can you provide learning for a number of participants that may have anxiety concerns, attention deficit disorder, behavioural issues or developmental disability? As Red Cross standards state you cannot modify content, how do we adapt learning that enables knowledge of first aid education and confidence in performing the practical skills with the willingness to act?
Within Canada, 2.9% of the population has a learning (2.3%) or developmental disability (0.6%) (Stats Can 2016). 
 
In this interactive session, first aid educators will review adapted first aid information, practical demonstration of activities and adapted skills and will provide hands-on practical application of adapted learning within a Standard or Emergency First Aid course. This session is geared to instructors / instructor trainers who experience different learning capabilities within their course settings.
11:30 am - 12:30 pmQualitative Insights for Developing First Aid Education on Drug Overdose
Emily Oliver, Senior Education Research Manager, British Red Cross
Speaker: Dr. Aaron Orkin, University of Toronto and Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Medicine Institute
Speaker: Dr. Andrew MacPherson, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia
Moderator: Dr. Andrew MacPherson, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia
Session content: Science to support the use of Naloxone in opiate overdose situations is strong. However, the evidence for effective education is scant, making it difficult to ensure that Naloxone is administered effectively by the first person on the scene of an overdose. Within the chain of survival behaviour (IFRC, 2016), this implies that whilst the clinical dimension of “first aid” is clear, it is less clear how to teach learners “early recognition”, “prevent & prepare” and “access help.” The British Red Cross piloted the addition of a naloxone training component (experimental) into the current overdose first aid session (control), measuring learners’ confidence and willingness to help in an overdose situation. The target audience for this training was drug users, and their family/friends and carers. Both sessions were effective, with the experimental session more effective at increasing confidence and willingness. Qualitative findings gathered through focus groups with the educators, brought to light some unexpected factors to do with overdose education and this target audience, including: the value of peer-learning and peer-support, the challenge of learner literacy and learner attention span, and potential barriers to do with willingness to call emergency services.
11:30 am - 12:30 pmEvidence Review 101 - Translating Science to Practice
Jonathan Epstein, Senior Director - Science and Content Development
This session will explore the process of translating ILCOR Consensus on Science with Treatment Recommendations through the Guidelines development process into current teaching and practice in first aid. While we strive to use evidence based guidelines and recommendations, they do not translate well into practice. This session will focus on the different approaches that may be used to develop instructor and course participants materials to ensure that the science makes it to the side of a person who is ill or injured.
11:30 am - 12:30 pmSOS, Help Me Fix It!
During this exciting toolbox session participants will work with peers to improve teaching strategies which have challenged them in the past but have potential for supporting dynamic learning once fine-tuned. Bring a teaching challenge, your thinking cap and spend an hour working with your peers to pump some air back in to your tires!
11:30 am - 12:30 pmSide Bar 5
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
12:30 pm - 1:30 pmLunch & Exhibits Open - Poster Presentation 2 / journal contributors
Poster Presentation 2 / journal contributors
1:30 pm - 2:30 pmWhat is First Aid Really Good For?
Dr. Aaron Orkin, University of Toronto and Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Medicine Institute
The global Disease Control Priorities Project recommends emergency care training for laypersons in low-resource settings, but the connection between emergency care training and reductions in the morbidity and mortality associated with emergency conditions has not been systematically reviewed. Together with an international team of reviewers, we designed and conducted a large-scale systematic review to identify the individual and community health effects of training laypeople to deliver prehospital emergency care interventions in underserviced populations and low-resource settings. We searched 12 electronic databases and screened over 17,000 papers and grey literature pieces to identify first aid and emergency care educational interventions with proven impacts on individual or community health. This workshop will explore the preliminary results of this systematic review and its implications for first aid education and practice. Most emergency care and first aid interventions arise from extrapolation from clinical practice among healthcare professionals. Some training programs have been evaluated on the basis of their educational efficacy, to demonstrate if trainees learn what they are taught. Fewer still have been evaluated to determine if trainees are able to use their skills in practice. But only a handful of first aid and emergency care interventions have been evaluated to see if the training saves lives, reduces morbidity, or enhances community health. In addition to established first aid interventions for injury and cardiac arrest, emergency care training for opioid overdose and paediatric infectious diseases have been shown to save lives — but are virtually absent in standard first aid curricula. While standard first aid training content arises from an established tradition, much of the educational content with the greatest health impacts have not been widely implemented or incorporated into first aid curricula.

Although first aid training is a nearly ubiquitous practice, relatively few studies explore the effect of these initiatives on individual or community health. First aid training should be based on science before tradition. The health and health equity effects of first aid and emergency care interventions might be enhanced globally by focusing on educational interventions with a proven health benefit, and by developing the science of first aid to understand and enhance its health impact.
2:30 pm - 2:45 pmBreak
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmBREAKOUT THEME: VULNERABLE POPULATIONS (select one session)
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmFrom Learners to Responders: Empowering People to Act within Challenging Environments
Ellen Gordon, Education Research Manager, British Red Cross
Emily Oliver, Senior Education Research Manager, British Red Cross
Thomas Wilp, Dr, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
Session content: Moving from first aid skills training to equipping and empowering people to respond is a challenge for first aid educators, and in particular for those working where resources are scarce, access to healthcare is impeded or impossible, or where a threat exists to civilians and responders. Seeking to approach to this challenge, this session hinges on the question: what forms of education would encourage someone to respond in a first aid emergency where their environment is a potentially limiting factor? The session will draw from an ongoing collaboration between the education research team at the British Red Cross and educators from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). ICRC delegates often provide first aid education in contexts known to be fragile or challenging. The resources that are available to their learners differ to those conventionally represented in first aid guidelines. These challenges concur with those working in many different contexts, including wilderness, and question the applicability of conventional approaches to first aid education. They suggest that educators need to equip learners with the flexibility and critical thinking skills to adapt to these contexts, and to take effective action with limited resources.  Identifying issues fundamental to all first aid education, this session will stimulate participants to reflect on their approach to social settings and environments, overturning clinically-centred or skills-based training in favour of asking: how do we empower someone to respond?
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmWhen is a Person Too Hot? Fever and First Aid
Dr. Jeffrey L. Pellegrino, Professor/Program Director, Aultman College of Nursing & Health Sciences
Throughout history fever has been a serious sign of illness. Sepsis affects over 26 million people worldwide each year and kills more children—5 million, than any other cause. In one US based study, 91% of sepsis cases came in from the community leaving this squarely as first aid issue. First aid education however has not treated this physiological sign with enough respect to stop the death of many young and older people. In a 2017 global market survey of 1,000 parents with a child in the house hold, only three-quarters had heard the word “sepsis,” but only 28 percent could name the signs of sepsis. A relatively simple measurement of body temperature, along with other signs should alert first aiders to act. This session will engage participants to discuss vulnerable populations to fever causing ailments and the psycho/social barriers to dealing with fever from a first aid perspective. Fitting fever into the Chain of Survival Behaviors will include signs & symptoms appropriate for lay responder recognition, education resources, and implications for future first aid guidelines.
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmStop the Bleeding + The Psychology of Renderig First Aid - Emotional, Legal and Ethical Questions.
Dariusz Wolman, Assistant Professor, Eastern Kentucky University
Kristopher Tharris
This session will describe some of the new technologies in tourniquets and provide education on live saving bleeding control. and will
then examine  some of the reason bystanders opt not to intervene during emergency situations. Role playing will be conducted to promote visual scenarios and questions.
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmMeasuring Education Outcomes - Arguably the Single Most Important Step in Advancing the First Aid Education Evidence Base
Christine Boase, Distance Worker, IFRC Global First Aid Reference Centre
Moderator: Joanna Muise, Senior Advisor for First Aid Program Development , Canadian Red Cross
In the global education arena, the science surrounding the measurement of education outcomes is very much in focus. Educationalists and academics can use reams of evidence to debate for example, the virtues of measuring hard or soft outcomes, or the rights and wrongs of the academic testing of children. Yet in the international first aid education scene, there is still little to no consensus on what or how education outcomes should be measured. Until we have this consensus, our education evidence base will remain relatively stagnant. To progress, we must agree which outcomes are paramount and how we will measure them. Then, and only then, will we level the international playing field, laying bare the effectiveness of our activity, and begin to make comparative studies to grow the evidence base. So beginning an agenda of continuous improvement. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Global First Aid Reference Centre (GFARC) is now engaged in driving forward an initiative on education outcomes. More program than project, the IFRC seeks to coordinate with a range of first aid educators across the world to pilot measuring education outcomes. In the lifecycle of their projects, participating educators will move through stages including deciding which outcomes to measure, how to operationalise the measurement, and how to interpret and apply the data to improve. The International First Aid and Resuscitation Guidelines recommend measuring knowledge, skills, confidence and willingness (International Federation of Red Cross and Red Cresent Societies, 2016). Broaden your search on outcomes and others come into the frame too such as measuring: critical thinking; helping behaviours; or attitudes (British Red Cross, 2017). Using a variety of stimuli including case studies, summaries and tools, groups of delegates will work through the stages of this project themselves. This will include selecting an outcome, and using the delegate’s own experiences to discuss, and perhaps resolve the practical challenges that may arise as they start measuring learner’s outcomes. This will lead to a collective discussion to prioritise the most relevant and suitable outcomes to measure.
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmKeeping it Real: Building Scenarios
Providing participants with the opportunity to learn through scenarios can be incredibly powerful. It can also be challenging and resource heavy if not planned well. This toolbox session will explore how to design and apply easy and effective scenarios in various first aid classrooms. Come prepared to play around with your peers and experience a new twist on scenario based learning.
2:45 pm - 3:45 pmSide Bar 6
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
4:00 pm - 5:00 pmBREAKOUT THEME: INNOVATIONS IN FIRST AID EDUCATION (select one session)
4:00 pm - 5:00 pmImplementing Infographics into CPR and First Aid Education to Effect Students’ Achievement and Attitude Towards Helping Behaviors
David Berry, Professor, Saginaw Valley State University
Context: Effective health communication and engagement in helping behaviors during an emergency by patients, caregivers, and the public is critically important. One way to increase communication effectiveness and engage shareholders is via the use of infographics. Objective: To explore the use of infographics as learning tools, examine standard infographic types and investigate what comprises a powerful infographic for learning and how this medium can influence cardiopulmonary (CPR) and first aid education as an educational tool. Background: Infographics are one of the new educational mediums used to provide information that can be targeted for a diverse American population with highly variable literacy skills. The National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) found that over a third of adults in the United States have basic or below basic health literacy skills, and 14% of American adults could only understand simple text. Even those individuals who possessed higher health literacy skills preferred shorter, simpler text.2 Description: Infographics use prominent visual representations of information intended to illustrate information efficiently and effectively using various visuals such as texts, pictures, drawings, diagrams, graphs, etc. Infographics are advantageous in learning because they have the power to improve comprehension by using graphics to enhance a learners ability to see patterns and trends while feeding into the learners’ natural tendency to learn by seeing and interacting. A good graphic reinforces to learners’ that their conclusion about a topic should be grounded in evidence and by challenging their ability to organize a hierarchy of systems, ie., the ability to tell what pieces of information are the most important and can have the greatest impact during an emergency in the case of first aid. Clinical Advantage(s): Evidence suggests that infographics support learning transfer and knowledge retention on learners with different thinking styles , assists learners to become actively involved in the learning process , lead to permanent learning6, supports educators to develop creative and productive learning activities with an effective presentation while improving understanding and concentration in the learning session. Conclusion(s): Infographics can be a powerful educational tool to influence CPR and first aid education as a educational tool by (1) communicate a consisnet message, (2) present a lot of data or information in a way that is compact and easy to comprehend, (3) to analyze data in order to discover cause-and-effect relationships, and (4) to periodically monitor the route of specific parameters. Word Count: 386
4:00 pm - 5:00 pmCommunity Based Health & First Aid (CBHFA) as a Success Model of Nepal Red Cross Public Awareness and Responsibilities Regarding Innovations in First Aid Education
Basanta Kumar Shrestha, Nepal Red Cross Society
Nepal has a difficult geo-physical structure, limited health facilities, difficult transport and limited means of communication. Thousands of people die annually due to injuries, accidents and inappropriate health practices. Therefore, CBHFA program has been playing a vital role in first aid, sanitation and hygiene promotion, CBH issues and community awareness Objective:To build capacity of the communities to promote their health and manage injuries and illness as well as prepare for and deal with disaster. Method: In the project area a number of committees are constituted to carry out the project activities such as CBH& FA Volunteers selection, organize trainings for volunteers, volunteers meetings, and sanitation campaign and health promotion initiatives. Community participation is ensured from the planning to evaluation phases of the program. Local committees perform directly with the Red Cross agencies to the implementation of the project. The Group usually works with non-funded activities mobilizing their own local resources. It fights against social evils embedded in the society by generating awareness in the community. Results: From ten districts, 750 households were surveyed. It demonstrates that about 93% of the local residents know about volunteers of their wards. According to the survey, about 95% people go with CBHFA-volunteers if any health problems or accidents happened to them. They are fully satisfied with the services provided by the volunteers. Volunteers frequently visit their home and motivate them for construction of toilet, promotion of hygiene and sanitation, demonstration of ORS preparation , disaster preparedness, create awareness regarding immunization, diarrheal diseases, ARI, malnutrition , antenatal check-up and so on. It also provides first aid and referral services. People’s satisfaction toward the volunteers’ services means they have become a most important components of the CBFA program. All the above-mentioned responses are the clear indication for the future that the CBHFA program will be institutionalize in the community level. Conclusion: CBFA service has established First aid service through volunteers in the community and enabling environment to practice positive health behavior. Communities are organized and prepared for probable disaster and RC district chapters, sub-branches at local level are capable in promoting and managing CBFA activities towards community. In the remote areas where health facilities are lacking, CBHFA program can be a useful and an affordable alternative for the timely relief and safety of the patients and wounded people. Author: Mr. Basanta Kumar Shrestha Project Co-coordinator Co-author: Ms. Mona Aryal Director Health Service Department, NRCS
4:00 pm - 5:00 pmHow can We be Proactive about Media Engagement in First Aid Education?
Tracey Taylor, First Aid Education Development Manager, British Red Cross
Session content: Digital media holds promise for first aid education, with opportunities to reach new learners and to deepen the engagement of existing learners. In 2016 alone, the British Red Cross recorded nearly 900,000 unique sessions on their First Aid apps. Whilst this number of people engaging with first aid is encouraging, the hourly, daily and monthly fluctuation of user engagement remains contingent upon external events outside the control of the Red Cross. Usage of first aid apps is linked to national news stories, such as terror attacks, external first aid campaigns, or even television episodes where someone is shown to suffer from a critical injury or illness requiring first aid. However, there is little consistency in whether or not an event has an effect on user engagement. Hence, the question is: how can we capture and build on digital engagement in a way that will lead to first aid learning? This session seeks to support participants in developing a strategy toward the link between media events and learner engagement. Session format: This session will be divided into two portions, each with its own take-home message. First we will facilitate a discussion using the analytics for our first aid app to inform how people are reacting to media events, asking: why do people look to first aid digital products in the event of an emergency, either on the news or in a fictional TV programme? Following this discussion, break-out groups will work with case studies involving a media event, each group will work retrospectively to assess how users engaged with the app following this event. The groups will go on to discuss strategies for supporting their own media outlets (social media, press releases, online advertising, prominence of first aid advice on the website, TV appearances etc.) in order to empower the population with first aid education in preparation for first aid emergencies. This session will help educators to think about their learners as people who are navigating an increasingly digitised world. Participants will learn how to embed first aid into people’s lives within a digital era, how to utilise the affordances of digital media in their product development cycle and how to frame digital events with appropriate and accessible first aid knowledge.
4:00 pm - 5:00 pmDoes the Right Arm Know What the Left Arm is Doing ?
Shelly Longmore, Canadian Red Cross, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Choosing Wisely Alberta
Who developed the infant airway obstruction technique currently being used? How long were their arms and how small were their babies? Was it developed under clinic conditions or anecdotally? Has the skill or it's effectiveness ever been re evaluated? Is it time to consider new options? After teaching first aid and basic life support skills to prospective babysitters, parents, family members, childcare workers and health professionals for nearly forty years, a few questions continue to resonate: who generally uses these skills and are they able to perform the skills as taught or do they have to modify during the moment of the emergency? Or, sadly are they unable to perform the skills as practiced on mannequins when it comes time to perform on a loved one when a crisis occurs? While teaching prospective babysitters it became obvious that most were unable to perform the skill for straddling the baby over the arms to do back blows and chest thrusts due to the combination of rescuer arm length and baby body length and weight. Adaptations were required for these circumstances. If this technique was easy to do and made arm length and size of baby less relevant and still effective, should the technique be added as an alternate method or should it be changed for all? This thought provoking session provides insight and opportunity to discuss and practice a new option and the possibility of highlighting an area of concern and a plausible solution for those making the recommendations for guidelines. Share the findings of a study comparing the arm lengths of caregivers and the body lengths of babies. Let's look at the facts, Consider new things and let's make a difference together. Bring your arms and your open minds!!
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm19 Ideas
This toolbox session is designed to bring together a super squad of 20 (or more) creative thinkers! Participants will have the opportunity to present a tricky topic within their teaching portfolio. Their peers will help them to come up with at least 19 different ways to approach this topic with learners. Get ready for a first aid creative thinking frenzy!

4:00 pm - 5:00 pmSide Bar 7
Are there things about first aid education that make you go hummmmm? Have you ever wanted to build a project or study to explore a facet of first aid education but you aren’t sure how to get started? As part of our ’un-conference’ we are creating an opportunity for emerging researchers to come together and work one-on-one with an experienced researcher in our idea incubator! As part of the incubator you will have the opportunity to spend an hour working with someone who loves first aid education (just like you!) and can share their experience and knowledge in setting up and supporting a project or study. The incubator will provide a relaxed environment for you to explore the idea together and to begin formulating a personal project plan. No previous experience in research is required - all you need to participate is a great idea that you want to explore and enthusiasm for first aid education, we will help you figure out the rest. Pre-registration is required, spaces are limited so sign up soon!
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm Under the Red Top

Come one! Come all!

Step right up into a world full of amusement, extravaganza, excitement and delicious cuisine! All that is sure to entertain you to your heart's content!

Join us under the Red Top, where you will have the opportunity to toss, throw, laugh, challenge your skills, meet and network with other “Carnival Goers” and taste food and drink that will delight your senses.

Performers will flood the floor captivating your imagination. Perhaps you’ll come across someone on stilts or have your fortune read! Delegates of all ages, you won’t want to miss the best event of the year! It will be a carnival visit sure to fill your evening with childhood memories and make you beam.

Day: Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Time:  6:30 - 9:30 pm

Cost: $100


Wednesday, April 25, 2018
7:00 am - 1:00 pmRegistration Open
8:00 am - 9:00 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 10:00 amThe Future of First Aid - Panel Discussion
Untitled
10:00 am - 11:00 amWe LOVE the Way You Think!
This Could be You!
The Canadian Red Cross and International Journal of First Aid Education have partnered together to challenge people from around the world to share their own innovative approach to first aid education! During this exciting plenary session semi-finalists will present their teaching strategy to the delegates for consideration and voting. The winning submission (selected based on audience choice) will be profiled within an upcoming edition of the International Journal of First Aid Education so that others from around the world are also able to benefit from your creative and inspiring way to educate others!
CLICK HERE to submit your teaching strategy for consideration for the INNOVATIVE FIRST AID EDUCATION CONTEST!
11:00 am - 11:15 amBreak
11:15 am - 12:15 pmMaking Sense of Mindfulness
Keith Macpherson

In this dynamic presentation mindfulness coach, Keith Macpherson demystifies the meaning and practice of mindfulness and offers concrete and practical tools and strategies to apply mindfulness to one’s everyday life. Through Keith’s five step framework towards a more mindful and fulfilling life, one can expect to gain a deeper awareness into how to de-stress, reclaim a proper work-life balance and live the life they are imagining. Keith integrates movement, music and group interaction into his presentations to ensure a dynamic learning environment that will support the projected outcomes and assist the participants in experiencing personal growth. Discover what has been stopping you from living a mindful life and expect to come away with a new outlook on how you can truly convert stress and burnout into successful inner peace and balance.

Expected Outcomes:

  1. A deeper understanding of Mindfulness practice and how to apply it to everyday life.
  2. Tools, exercises and strategies to de-stress and relax.
  3. An understanding of what is blocking you from the life you are imagining for yourself.
  4. An introduction to meditation techniques and breathing exercises.
  5. Learn new strategies for finding a work-life balance.
  6. Integrating and understanding the mind-body-soul connection. 

 

12:15 pm - 12:30 pmConference Closing
Closing Remarks and Awards
12:30 pm - 1:00 pmLunch to go