ICTC 2018
 

Workshops


Emergency Planning for your Organisation
Valerie Hussain, Emergency Services Preparedness Facilitator, Australian Red Cross Emergency Services

This workshop will look at your personal and business emergency plans which are non- hazard specific and identify any gaps which need to be addressed.

How well is your plan communicated to your staff and clients?  

What are your triggers to enact your emergency plan?  Where do you get reliable information? where will you go? How will you get there? Who will you tell?

Australian Red Cross Emergency Rediplan is an easy 5 step method of preparing for an emergency for any age and ability.  People who are better prepared for emergencies recover more quickly.  We will explore some scenarios that will test your plan, your organisations response and your ability for your business to recover from the event.

We will help you to understand why emotional preparedness and community connectedness is so essential in any emergency.To help you prepare better, we will look at what reliable links, websites and smartphone apps such as Australian Red Cross ‘Get Prepared’ you can use for yourself, your organisation and your clients.



Creating an enabling local business environment
Simon White, Managing Director Publicus Pty Ltd

Local government is often overlooked as a critical arena for microeconomic reforms that are designed to influence the decisions of private businesspeople to invest in the local economy, stimulate innovation and create jobs. While the private sector creates jobs and drives economic growth, governments set the conditions in which this can occur.

This presentation/workshop will focus on how to improve the conditions for local businesses. It explores the roles of local government in supporting local businesses as a way of fostering economic growth and business competitiveness and looks at how local councils can create better conditions for local business growth.

Councils often fail to integrate their economic development strategies with their planning and regulatory functions. This results in a disjointed approach to business development in which local businesses are easily frustrated and investment curtailed.

Local governments can create better, more dynamic and competitive business environments in which local businesses thrive. They do this by better understanding the challenges, constraints and opportunities facing local businesses and by taking a ‘whole of the economy’ perspective that is not dominated by the voice or interests of one or two large, noisy or politically connected businesses.

Councils can create a more enabling local business environment by reducing the cost of compliance, reducing risk and increasing competition, making it easier for new businesses to start-up and enter the market.

This presentation/workshop will present a clear framework for understanding the role of the local business environment and use practical examples from around Australia and the world to illustrate how local councils can become more responsive to the needs and opportunities facing their greatest economic asset––their local business and investor community.

More details on workshops and times within the program being released in July.