Interweave Yarn Fest 2018
 

Workshops by Deb Robson

New Registration

Add to shopping cart Remove from shopping cart
04/12/20186:00 pm - 9:00 pmThursday, April 12, 2018 
1085, How "Should" I Spin This? - $120
 
Click on images to enlarge in new window.
Level: Intermediate Description of Workshop Levels
Technique: Spinning 

Do you wonder how to spin a new fiber the "right" way? Or are you stuck with one favorite method that you use for all fibers? In this class, wool expert, Deb Robson, will choose one special fleece, which you'll put through its paces! You'll explore the variety of ways to spin a fiber: try different preparation methods, vary the amount of twist, experiment with plying structure, and more. Prepare to be surprised at the yarns you can make with one fiber. 

Prerequisites/Skills Needed: Students should be comfortable spinning singles and plying. Familiarity with either carding or combing, or both, or a willingness to practice them in the middle of things. On-the-fly instruction can be given, but with a 3-hour class, a background in either carding or combing will be very helpful.


Materials you are required to bring: Spinning tool- wheel or spindle; any fiber prep tools that you have (hand cards, fiber combs, dog tools, flickers) paper and pencil, as well as a nostepinne or empty t.p. roll to use on place of one, can be useful. There will be some tools available to try out.  


Homework: None 

1085, How "Should" I Spin This? - $120 [More Info]
Deb Robson
04/14/20189:00 am - 4:30 pmSaturday, April 14, 2018 
1086, Wool Types - $220
 
Click on images to enlarge in new window.
Level: Advanced Description of Workshop Levels
Technique: Spinning

Wool comes in an amazing number of types, each of which invites and rewards different approaches to preparation and use. The fine wools, like Merino, are soft but not durable (yet when spun appropriately can last a gratifyingly long time). The mid-grade wools provide serviceable fabrics for daily use: not too soft, not too crisp, they have become one of the mainstays of industrial wool production and may be underestimated by handspinners. The longwools can stand up to a lot of wear and produce nearly luminous colors when dyed but may be challenging to put to use. And then there are the double-coated fleeces, which can be initially perplexing but have the potential to yield every type of strand from cording to soft shawls. Each type of fiber reveals its nature most effectively to the handspinner, rather than through mechanical processing. Working with clean but otherwise straight-from-the-sheep fleece samples, you’ll get an overview of the types of wool that will let you evaluate the wools you encounter, including the odd ones that don’t fit a specific category. We’ll have a lot of fun and you’ll develop a solid framework for understanding the possibilities within the wide world of wool. You’ll go home with enough fiber to continue your experiments.

Prerequisites/Skills Needed: Able to independently spin singles and make a two-ply yarn; experience in preparing fibers for spinning is useful but not essential

Materials you are required to bring: Wheel or spindle; fiber-prep tools of choice (combs, carders, flicker, or any other OR dog-grooming combs or slickers); the ability to wind a small center-pull ball and ply from it (or skill at Andean plying, or a lazy kate and extra bobbins); sampling tools as convenient, like knitting needles, crochet hooks, or Weave-It or similar extra-simple loom; optional tape and/or hole-punch, for keeping track of fiber samples and yarns (record cards will be provided); a notepad and pen or pencil.

Homework: None


1086, Wool Types - $220 [More Info]
Deb Robson